The following post comes courtesy of John T. Maloney, who sent me an email reply to one of my newsletters and it just was too good not to share. Thankyou John. Nicely delivered.

The ‘gig economy’ is dopey. Always had a problem w/the term.

For me, a gig is a trident tip spear used for gigging. Period.

Growing up in rural and coastal Connecticut, from April to November, gigging was a principal pastime. We’d go after anything gigable, but mostly bullfrogs and flounder. It was very effective. 

Imagine it was quite unpleasant for the gigged fauna. (Not unlike the ‘gig economy.’) Most of the catch made it to the table. We could gig in the Winter, by simply cutting a hole in the ice, chumming and waiting. It was cold and not as fun.

Once moving to California, the prospect of gigging New England Style was not really available. However, gigging with a modest technological change, was even better than gigging in ponds and estuaries on the East Coast.

Supposedly the Hawaiians invented the ‘Hawaiian Sling‘. It’s a gig with a piece of surgical tube attached. It is wicked effective. 

From Santa Barbara to Mendocino got to gig/sling a lot. The best was the halibut at the beach at the entrance to Diablo Canyon in SLO at night. Wow. Could fill my freezer with one clean shot. (Later learned it was a key halibut spawning area, thus frowned upon.) It was fun and delicious while it lasted. 

Gigging is a good metaphor for the gig economy. Just make sure you are on the right end of the gig. Avoid the King Neptune of Gigging, Dara Khosrowshahi.

Neptune and Amphitrite in the storm

Have to say … of gigging as described by John I know nought, but totally with him on the Dara reference and that is another story about why a gig is no solution.

Doc Searls, Godfather of The VRM/Me2B Movement observed recently that he writes on 4 (what amount to) personal blogs … which made me feel a lot better about myself. In that same post he wrote;

Bigger than all four of those blogs is Linux Journal, where I wrote a great deal, including what amounted to blog posts on its website, for 25 years. That ended when Linux Journal ceased business in August. Also, as of today the entire site, with all its archives, is offline, erasing a third to a half of what I’ve written online so far.

Doc Searls

Think about that …. a third to a half of what you have written online is suddenly not available. And you wonder why I write articles like this.

The Scream ....

It’s a cautionary tale because Doc (who’s final position at Linux Journal was Editor in Chief) might reasonably have expected that whoever owned Linux Journal wouldn’t suddenly remove it from public view.

Rule Number One : When it comes to your IP trust no one. Keep your articles and writing in a place that you have access to and control.

Rule Number Two : There is no Rule Number Two.


On a side note, but keeping the theme of Doc … he recently published the links to the last three posts on the VRM Blog. They are good reads.

People are the real edge

We’re not data. We’re digital. Let’s research that.

What law might clear the way for VRM development?

Guernica – Picasso – 1937

Did John Lyndon Hate The Floyd?

Is Pink Floyd a punk band?

Are people really surprised when Roger Waters delivers protest?

Why is the film not Called ‘Us and Them’?

All this and more in this week’s newsletter.

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If you want to keep abreast with People First developments, share your best email with us and it will be done.

At Booming Toptal, No Stock for Employees or Investors

I mean none – 100% owned by Taso Du Val and I assume none by all the rest on this page.

As Toptal’s Chief Executive Officer, Taso manages Toptal’s core team of hundreds of team members distributed throughout the world, with a focus on innovation. Since Toptal was founded in 2010, Taso has led it to become the largest high-skilled, on-demand talent network in the world. Taso serves on the board of multiple organizations, advising on talent strategy and innovation for Fortune 100s and nonprofits. Taso has guest lectured at Harvard Business School, Wharton, and Oxford on talent management and entrepreneurship.

Toptal’s Web Site

Anyway, what he does and how he runs his business is – well – his business. But it got me to wondering … what he is advising those other companies to do when it comes to employee engagement? Employee motivation?

From where I sit, these words resonate;

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Needless to say those three words grabbed my attention immediately. And then when he said …

The culture of schooling is radically at odds with the culture of learning that produces innovators.

Tony Wagner

I was hooked.

Very good Ted Talk – just one gripe …

He just about opens the talk with

I came to understand, that there’s a set of core competencies every young person must be well on their way to mastery before he or she finished high school.

– critical thinking and problem solving

– collaboration across networks and leading by influence

– agility and adaptability

– initiative and entropenorialism

– effective oral and written communication

– accessing and analyzing information

– curiosity and imagination

Tony Wagner

i.e. if you have left school, sorry – we taught you all wrong as to how to succeed in the life in front of you.

What he should have said was

I came to understand, that there’s a set of core competencies every person must master.

I know he doesn’t mean it and I guess it is about education – but the implication is that you have left school then ‘we taught you all wrong’.

Keeping that in mind … well worth a watch.

As I finished this short post, I headed out to the 'google-web-net' to see if I could find a suitable and representative image. I was failing unitl I focussed on 'Redux'. The images associated with Redux are highly Redux oriented, with a high degree of focus on their logo. What you might expect, given the name - but this is not about what they do. So I kept looking and discovered this.
Let go of everything or anything and breathe.

It’s as if Karin Edgett read my mind. The image was perfect and the words so in tune with my thoughts, that I couldn’t resist.

My entry ‘let go of everything or anything and breathe’ is part of a series of paintings and haiku exploring infinity in it’s transformative sense.

Karin Edgett

Back On Topic

Interesting to read this post from Doc Searls today – which also happens to be his birthday.

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I have had versions of the following post on a number of different blogs and publications for the longest time. The time has come to formalize it, since content, its ownership and how we think about it  is critical to the principles of People First. 

A recent question from someone in one of my many groups …

“Why is it so difficult to find a freelance writing gig?

My reply …

Because the people who pay for writing have no clue of the value, which is why they call it ‘content’ which we know has no value and is homogenous ‘filler’ that can be swapped out at a moments notice.

Here’s my basic rule …

Please – Do Not Call ‘It’ Content!

…. book, novel, short story, article, white paper, promotional piece, advert, painting, sculpture, song, opera, photograph, image, graphic art, poster, fine art … anything … anything but ‘content’.

Why?

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To be strictly accurate – we should be talking about Blocking Trackers

… I came across this article (note if you are using an ‘ad blocker’ … then guess what – they tell you that you have an ‘ad blocker’ on …. actually I don’t use an ‘ad blocker‘ – I use a ‘tracking blocker’.

That aside, I thought I would extract some pertinent quotes from the piece and add my comments. The piece appeared in Adage and was written by Jason Jercinovic – and so all the quotes below I attribute to him. Adage says that “Jason Jercinovic is global head of marketing innovation and global brand director at Havas.”

Havas is a pretty good agency that has produced some great campaigns for Air New Zealand, Global Mental Health and Canal+ – so I kind of feel that they (should at least) know what they are doing. I’ll go further. They do – but it is clear that they remain bought into the narrative of ‘poor us – we have to do this 1 for it to work’. They don’t.

So – let’s get too it …

and no one can blame the advertising industry for rapidly adopting them.

I can!

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