… Long Live Capitalism.

Here’s a snippet from a long-form interview of Yvon Chouinard in Fast Company.

Yvon Chouinard

Question : In the past, you consulted with folks at large companies, such as Walmart, and came away not so convinced of their actual ability to pursue sustainability. If we’re looking to create a better version of capitalism, what do you think should be done with publicly traded companies?

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Over here I share a lot of Gaping Void’s work. Hugh Macleod more often than not nails it. But this one needed a comment.

if it’s not a job, you are not an artist.

Boom! That’s the way it works, for anyone in the innovation or creative business. History decides what is ‘art’, history decides what is ‘important’ …

Meanwhile, you’re just doing your job, you’re just showing up, trying to be a pro, you’re just trying to be a grownup, you’re just trying to get paid.

Hugh Mcleod – Gaping Void

Whilst I don’t disagree that ‘history’ decides what is important – Hugh of all people knows that ‘history’ is not neutral. An example would be that ‘History’ for the longest time did not recognize art that came from (say) Africa, because we ‘superior’ Westerners were writing off thousands and thousands of years of ‘art’ – because it didn’t fit into our Western sensibilities and so classified the art into Natural History Museums.

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The following post comes courtesy of John T. Maloney, who sent me an email reply to one of my newsletters and it just was too good not to share. Thankyou John. Nicely delivered.

The ‘gig economy’ is dopey. Always had a problem w/the term.

For me, a gig is a trident tip spear used for gigging. Period.

Growing up in rural and coastal Connecticut, from April to November, gigging was a principal pastime. We’d go after anything gigable, but mostly bullfrogs and flounder. It was very effective. 

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Doc Searls, Godfather of The VRM/Me2B Movement observed recently that he writes on 4 (what amount to) personal blogs … which made me feel a lot better about myself. In that same post he wrote;

Bigger than all four of those blogs is Linux Journal, where I wrote a great deal, including what amounted to blog posts on its website, for 25 years. That ended when Linux Journal ceased business in August. Also, as of today the entire site, with all its archives, is offline, erasing a third to a half of what I’ve written online so far.

Doc Searls

Think about that …. a third to a half of what you have written online is suddenly not available. And you wonder why I write articles like this.

The Scream ....

It’s a cautionary tale because Doc (who’s final position at Linux Journal was Editor in Chief) might reasonably have expected that whoever owned Linux Journal wouldn’t suddenly remove it from public view.

Rule Number One : When it comes to your IP trust no one. Keep your articles and writing in a place that you have access to and control.

Rule Number Two : There is no Rule Number Two.


On a side note, but keeping the theme of Doc … he recently published the links to the last three posts on the VRM Blog. They are good reads.

People are the real edge

We’re not data. We’re digital. Let’s research that.

What law might clear the way for VRM development?

Counting both noun and verb forms, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) lists and defines thirteen separate ‘gigs’. 

‘A flighty, giddy girl’ was where it all started and then ‘spin’, ‘whirl’, ‘whirligig’, ‘fool’, giggle and ‘joke’ are all in one way or associated with the word. Even when you get up to the 18th century where it meant ‘light one-horse carriage’, its origin might be ..

perhaps based on the ‘bouncing, whirling’ sense of the earlier ‘gig’.

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Guernica – Picasso – 1937

Did John Lyndon Hate The Floyd?

Is Pink Floyd a punk band?

Are people really surprised when Roger Waters delivers protest?

Why is the film not Called ‘Us and Them’?

All this and more in this week’s newsletter.

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At Booming Toptal, No Stock for Employees or Investors

I mean none – 100% owned by Taso Du Val and I assume none by all the rest on this page.

As Toptal’s Chief Executive Officer, Taso manages Toptal’s core team of hundreds of team members distributed throughout the world, with a focus on innovation. Since Toptal was founded in 2010, Taso has led it to become the largest high-skilled, on-demand talent network in the world. Taso serves on the board of multiple organizations, advising on talent strategy and innovation for Fortune 100s and nonprofits. Taso has guest lectured at Harvard Business School, Wharton, and Oxford on talent management and entrepreneurship.

Toptal’s Web Site

Anyway, what he does and how he runs his business is – well – his business. But it got me to wondering … what he is advising those other companies to do when it comes to employee engagement? Employee motivation?

From where I sit, these words resonate;

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Needless to say those three words grabbed my attention immediately. And then when he said …

The culture of schooling is radically at odds with the culture of learning that produces innovators.

Tony Wagner

I was hooked.

Very good Ted Talk – just one gripe …

He just about opens the talk with

I came to understand, that there’s a set of core competencies every young person must be well on their way to mastery before he or she finished high school.

– critical thinking and problem solving

– collaboration across networks and leading by influence

– agility and adaptability

– initiative and entropenorialism

– effective oral and written communication

– accessing and analyzing information

– curiosity and imagination

Tony Wagner

i.e. if you have left school, sorry – we taught you all wrong as to how to succeed in the life in front of you.

What he should have said was

I came to understand, that there’s a set of core competencies every person must master.

I know he doesn’t mean it and I guess it is about education – but the implication is that you have left school then ‘we taught you all wrong’.

Keeping that in mind … well worth a watch.

Albert-László Barabási

Backed by mathematical analysis, network theorist Albert-László Barabási explores the hidden mechanisms that drive success — no matter your field — and uncovers an intriguing connection between your age and your chance of making it big..

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