From time to time, my newsletter gets a little TOO long and then I cut and move some of the more self-contained chunks to here, so that people can read the newsletter and if interested can jump to here for more detail. This is one of those chunks.

Are we winning? Well a whole lot more than we might have been pre-internet. 

Ad blockers are used by some 25% of internet users in 2019. In real terms, this means that 25% of internet advertising that uses trackers will not reach their intended audience. (It’s quite a bit more complicated than that, but the point is that somehow the word got out that people were being tracked and it was those pesky Ads doing all the tracking – enter Adblocking and so an industry was born and an ‘arms race’ ensued.)

The peak of the internet searching for the term ‘Ad blocker’ was September 2015. 

Me – I call it ‘tracking blocking’. There are sites that allow advertising and do not track. Ad blockers don’t work there – because there is no tracking to be blocked.

But there is no escape that at one point people were increasingly aware of ad blocking – what it was doing and most importantly – what it was doing to them. They got interested. And then it all fell away.

That’s the mistake – we need to keep piling on. Keep reminding people what is going on.

From time to time, my newsletter gets a little TOO long and then I cut and move some of the more self-contained chunks to here, so that people can read the newsletter and if interested can jump to here for more detail. This is one of those chunks.

If you are old enough, you will remember that the French Government blew up a boat belonging to Greenpeace in the Auckland harbor, New Zealand. (If you aren’t old enough – trust me – this is not a movie – this is history.) That was 35 years ago – 14 years after Greenpeace was founded to protest the detonation of a nuclear bomb. Since the early 90s Greenpeace has had a broader goal that puts Climate Change front and centre. They are but one organization fighting that particular battle.

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From time to time, my newsletter gets a little TOO long and then I cut and move some of the more self-contained chunks to here, so that people can read the newsletter and if interested can jump to here for more detail. This is one of those chunks.

AIDA is a marketing model that is well over 100 years old. It has gone through countless iterations, twists and turns. It has been cast out – only to reappear with different words. More stages. Less stages. The ‘Young Turks’ who run today’s corporate marketing department will be using some version of the AIDA model. It is a simple, timeless truth that goes something like this:

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… Long Live Capitalism.

Here’s a snippet from a long-form interview of Yvon Chouinard in Fast Company.

Yvon Chouinard

Question : In the past, you consulted with folks at large companies, such as Walmart, and came away not so convinced of their actual ability to pursue sustainability. If we’re looking to create a better version of capitalism, what do you think should be done with publicly traded companies?

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Over here I share a lot of Gaping Void’s work. Hugh Macleod more often than not nails it. But this one needed a comment.

if it’s not a job, you are not an artist.

Boom! That’s the way it works, for anyone in the innovation or creative business. History decides what is ‘art’, history decides what is ‘important’ …

Meanwhile, you’re just doing your job, you’re just showing up, trying to be a pro, you’re just trying to be a grownup, you’re just trying to get paid.

Hugh Mcleod – Gaping Void

Whilst I don’t disagree that ‘history’ decides what is important – Hugh of all people knows that ‘history’ is not neutral. An example would be that ‘History’ for the longest time did not recognize art that came from (say) Africa, because we ‘superior’ Westerners were writing off thousands and thousands of years of ‘art’ – because it didn’t fit into our Western sensibilities and so classified the art into Natural History Museums.

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In a recent newsletter, I referenced a book; Everything I Know About Business I Learned from the Grateful Dead which unbeknownst to me was written by a friend of a friend. Turns out the two friends used to swap Grateful Dead stories and on reading my post this story came to mind. When I read the story, it seemed a perfect addition to my Travels Without Charley series – so please read on and enjoy the first ‘guest post’ in the series.


One favourite was about a concerned father and his 16 year old son.

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I discovered the three words process only last year from Chris Brogan. It worked nicely for 2019, so I repeated the exercise for 2020. Since publishing the three words in my annual new year newsletter, a number of people have asked questions;

  • where did the idea come from?
  • what are the rules?
  • can you tell me more about the process?
  • is it ok to have four words?

etc etc

So first – not my idea. I got it from Chris Brogan – but I don’t think he started it. To fill in some gaps – this is what Chris has to say.

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